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TTIP&CETA: growth over welfare
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Oftentimes discussions about the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) or the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is very detailed. Therefore, it can be helpful to take a step back. CETA and/or TTIP i must not only be approached at the level of rates, growth rates, the chlorine chicken, and controversial ISDS. What is the purpose of these trade deals? And is that purpose justified?

This article first appeared in DenkWijzer (ThinkGuide), the annual publication of the Scientific Institute of the ChristenUnie (CU). September 2016, Volume 16, No. 2.

Oftentimes discussions about the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) or the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is very detailed. Therefore, it can be helpful to take a step back. CETA and/or TTIP i must not only be approached at the level of rates, growth rates, the chlorine chicken, and controversial ISDS. What is the purpose of these trade deals? And is that purpose justified?

“We pray that peoples of all faiths, all races, all nations, may have their great human needs satisfied; that those now denied opportunity shall come to enjoy it to the full; that all who yearn for freedom may experience its spiritual blessings; that those who have freedom will understand, also, its heavy responsibilities; that all who are insensitive to the needs of others will learn charity; that the scourges of poverty, disease and ignorance will be made to disappear from the earth, and that, in the goodness of time, all peoples will come to live together in a peace guaranteed by the binding force of mutual respect and love.”

 

These wonderful words were spoken by President Eisenhower during his farewell address. In the same speech, he expressed his concern about the growing influence of large international companies and in particular the Military Industrial Complex (MIC) in the United States (U.S.).The words of Eisenhower remain relevant today, for instance in light of the free trade agreement that is negotiated between the European Union (EU) and the U.S.

Author Christiaan Meinen works for Sallux, the think tank of the European Christian Political Movement (ECPM). Christiaan has an interest in geopolitics, (EU) foreign policies, sustainability, and military doctrine, technologies, and policies